aphorism (n.) 1520s (especially in reference to the “Aphorisms of Hippocrates”), from Middle French aphorisme (14c., aufforisme), from Late Latin aphorismus, from Greek aphorismos “definition, pithy sentence,” from aphorizein “to mark off, divide,” from apo- “from” (see apo-) + horizein “to bound” (see horizon).

An aphorism is a short, pithy statement containing a truth of general import; an axiom is a statement of self-evident truth; a theorem is a demonstrable proposition in science or mathematics; anepigram is like an aphorism, but lacking in general import.

 

“Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away.”      phillip k. dick

…discuss

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